First off-road: San Felipe to Route 1, Baja California, Mexico

Since we left San Felipe we had some adventures. We started heading south midday and realized 40 miles down the road that we lost the spare keys to all the locks and my bike. it was a frustrating couple hours of riding back, scouring the road, riding around san felipe again, being unsuccessful and sweaty and grumpy. We gave up eventually and headed out to campo percebu. When we were stopped on the side of the road looking for the keys an american woman stopped and asked us if we needed help. she invited us to come by her house if we needed anything. not exactly an invitation to spend the night, but we decided to interpret it that way. Campo Percebu is about 20 miles south of San Felipe down a two mile sandy road. Driving down it was a bit scary for me because the bike was drifting a bit. when we made it down we were invited to some beers by some americans hanging out in the cantina. they invited us to spend the night with them at a campo a little bit north of Percebu

. We decided to go for it since they had electricity and started driving back down the sandy road as the sun was sinking. I hit some deep sand, hit the gas like i was told but lost control of the bike. Based on the tire marks it looks like my bike skidded sideways, hit some sharp rocks and launched in to the air about four feet. I came down facing the opposite direction on the road. I was totally unhurt but i started crying when i saw how messed up my front rim was and how busted my rear tire was. I really thought our trip was over based on how the rim looked. it got dark while we tried to pump some air into the tires, but it was hopeless. i stayed with the bike while yaniv went back to the camps to look for help. Amazingly, since the place is mostly deserted this time of year, he found Klaus and his daughter Melia watching a movie in front of their garage.

Klaus is a highway patrol officer in San Diego. He’s building up his house in Percebu and used to race in the Baja 1000 (he won some races too). He put us up for the night and took us into town the next morning to have my wheels fixed. it took the tire place about an hour to bang my rim back in and patch up the tube and the tire. we never could have fixed it ourselves. without Klaus’s help i don’t know what we would have done. I think that has been the theme of our trip so far, amazing people coming out just when we need them. the fact that Klaus is also an experienced off-road motorcyclist was really helpful. we left his house that same day and headed for the dirt road south of Puertocitos.

Because of my crash i was a bit nervous on the dirt road but really it was fine. We camped on the hill side with the spectacular mountains behind us and the sea in front. it was a hot uncomfortable night but it was also nice to be alone in the wilderness. We woke up to watch the sunrise and we left early to beat the heat. After that we had another 10 miles to gonzaga bay. we stopped there for fuel and water but it was too hot to camp. we kept heading south another 40 miles on the dirt road and thankfully made it to hwy 1 with no more flat tires. We also stopped at Coco’s corner and checked out the underwear on the wall. he seems like an interesting guy. i loved all the pictures of the hard core bikers

From then on it was a painful two hours to Guerro Negro. I thought my butt would fall off. i was hoping it would fall off so then it would stop hurting. Guerro Negro is a dirty little port town on the pacific side. the only good thing about being there was the cool weather. we stayed in a cheap and smelly hotel (i saw a mouse climb onto the other bed at some point) but we were happy to shower and be off the bike. we had yummy shrimp and scallop tacos, watched a movie and crashed. the next day we drove south east into the heat towards mulege. we arrived in the dark and followed our couchsurfing host’s directions to his little house. it is in the mexican side of town where all the streets are still dirt. Bill is a grumbly old man who curses a lot but he has been a great host. its hard to know when he’s talking to you or himself. we celebrated my birthday by cooking at home because all of the restaurants were closed. last year this week mulege was hit by a devastating hurricane. apparently the locals need another to hit this year because their local economy depends on rebuilding the gringos houses.

I guess I knew how hard this trip would be before we started. actually, i said i knew it would be hard, but my imagination couldn’t comprehend the reality. The ache all over my body after a full day of riding is so intense, do I really want to be doing this for another 9 1/2 months? time will tell

my bike taking it’s “dirt nap”

From baja california norte

you can see the rock i hit and the lack of tire marks allllll the way over to the bush that i partially took out

From baja california norte

our saviors

From baja california norte

camping on the way to gonzaga bay

From baja california norte

yaniv at gonzaga bay. think we have enough shit?

From baja california norte

Coco’s corner

From baja california norte
From baja california norte
From baja california norte

fixing shit

http://life-cycles.org/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/digg_48.png http://life-cycles.org/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/stumbleupon_48.png http://life-cycles.org/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/google_48.png http://life-cycles.org/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/facebook_48.png http://life-cycles.org/wp-content/plugins/sociofluid/images/twitter_48.png
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply